A Word about the King

Smith--You_Are_What_You_Love--p_13.jpg

image courtesy of James K. A. Smith, You Are What You Love, p. 13

I distinctly remember the first time I heard this passage explained in a way that left me angry. It was the summer of 1994 and I was a student at Cornell, taking class on political theory. My professor was a highly respected historian, and he worked sequentially through Western political theory beginning with Socrates and Plato and ending with Marx.

This passage came up in his section on Christian theories of politics, during which he focused on three peo: Christ Jesus, Paul, and Augustine). What he said about verse 26 shocked me: “Jesus was a radical who opposed traditional family values.”

I was incensed. How dare he speak like that? And yet over time I’ve come to realize that he had probably reflected on that verse more carefully and more fully than I had. Granted, the professor was trying to be provocative, he sought to incite a response. Then again so was Jesus. But we Christians often try to limit the provocation, the truly radical nature of this statement—and in so doing, we’ve removed the teeth of this passage.

So what was Jesus really saying? What does it mean to hate father and mother and the rest of your family—to follow him? How could Jesus dare to say such a thing?

Title: A Word about the King

Text: Luke 14.25–35

Overview

  • disordered loves
  • divine claim
  • terms of peace

Resources

 

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